Degree Type: 

Master of Arts

Department: 

Department of English

Programme Duration: 

2 years (Standard Entry)

Modes of Study: 

Sandwich

About Programme: 

The M.A. (Sandwich) programme caters for workers and professionals who may not have the opportunity to obtain a graduate degree as full-time students.

Career Opportunities: 

Not Published

Entry Requirements: 

  • A good first degree (at least, Second Class Lower Division in English or a related discipline)

  • Candidate should pass an admission interview

 

Programme Structure

Level 500

First Semester

ENG 801: Phonology
3 Credit(s)

The course begins with an introduction to the major theories of phonology, including classical phonemics, prosodic phonology and generative phonology,

and then focuses on the segmental and non-segmental features of modern English.  There will also be a practical phonetics component involving the

use of the Department’s modern language laboratory.

 

 

 

ENG 818: Research Methods
3 Credit(s)

This course will focus on research methods and techniques of general bibliography. Students will be equipped with the resources and basic research

material in English literary studies and the skills and tools in presenting the findings of literary research. The course also explores methodological

issues such as sampling, field research, finding and formulating a research topic, writing a research proposal, annotating references,

developing conceptual and theoretical frameworks. 

ENG 828S: Language and Literacies
3 Credit(s)

This course offers students insight into the current understanding of literacy and multiliteracies, drawing on key scholars in the field and the implication

this has for both teaching and research in and outside educational institutional. It also looks at how language informs literacy development. Areas to

be covered include the changing definition of literacy, the relationship between language and literacy, cultural literacy and visual literacy.

ENG 825S: English Morphology and Syntax
3 Credit(s)

This course provides exposure to English grammar. It includes a study of English word structure and an examination of English phrases, clauses and constructions.

The course will be devoted to issues of verb morphology and argument structure. It will then focus on tense, mood, and aspect systems of English.

It is especially interested in the insights that contemporary theoretical work on English morphology and syntax brings to descriptive grammar.

ENG 825S: English Morphology and Syntax
3 Credit(s)

This course provides exposure to English grammar. It includes a study of English word structure and an examination of English phrases, clauses and

constructions.The course will be devoted to issues of verb morphology and argument structure. It will then focus on tense, mood, and aspect systems of English.

It is especially interested in the insights that contemporary theoretical work on English morphology and syntax brings to descriptive grammar.

ENG 811S: Studies in Literature
3 Credit(s)

Perhaps these two contemporary writers differ mainly in the sources of their influences. Yet, in spite of Ayi Kwei Armah’s absorption in the ideas of Frantz Fanon, and

Ngugi Wa Thiongo’s alignment with a folksy kind of Marxism, both writers explore the actual, spiritual and moral terrain of African life and history. Both express a concern for African wholeness;

both are disturbed by a history of European exploitation in Africa; both have attacked the notion that economic relationships among people can be meaningfully studied from emotional and moral concerns;

and yet both writers seem convinced that humans cannot produce good work unless they are themselves good. This course will study the complete up-to-date writing of these two writers with a view to

assessing the value of their contribution to modern African thought.

ENG 814S: Register Studies
3 Credit(s)

This course is designed to appeal to candidates who are interested in working with large amounts of language data as well as those whose work involves writing in different modes (e.g. secretaries).

It looks at regular linguistic patterning in different domains of language use. It is intended to improve the writing of candidates by introducing them to the meaning expressed by the different patterns.

Second Semester

ENG 826S: Semantics and Pragmatics
3 Credit(s)

The course commences with a definition of the goals of a theory of meaning and theories of word meaning. The course is devoted to the concepts and constituents of word

meaning and gradually moves to larger constructions, sentence meaning and utterance meaning (that is, meaning in actual communication). The remaining part of the

course will cover the area of pragmatics. Examples of concepts to be covered in pragmatics include politeness, implicature, speech acts, deixis, and presupposition.

ENG 804: Sociolinguistics
3 Credit(s)

This course is particularly suited to candidates who are interested in the relation between language and social interaction as well as language form and function.

It is concerned with the issues of who uses English, to whom, in what situation and how in a second language context.  The emphasis is on the Ghanaian situation.

ENG 829S: Seminar in English Studies
3 Credit(s)

In this course, students would be required to read, analyze, discuss, and evaluate in depth an area of English Studies which interests them and which is otherwise not explored in

any of the courses available. Areas may include Stylistics, Teaching of English Language, Language Acquisition, etc. Students will be required to seminar presentations in class